Senior Moving and Living | Moving Squad

Everything You Need to Know About Senior Moving in South Florida

Whether you’re a senior yourself or you’re helping seniors with a move, this article will be a valuable resource for you! We’re going to cover the ins and outs of moving into a South Florida retirement or assisted living community and equip you with helpful tips for moving your senior parents into your South Florida home.

Preparing Your Senior for the Move

 

With Seniors, Downsizing will be necessary.

 Over time, you accumulate a lot of stuff. As you get older, a lot of that stuff takes up space. While some of it holds sentimental value, a lot of it is nothing more than ‘stuff.’ Separate the mere ‘stuff’ from anything you can’t bear to part with or keepsakes that can be left with family members. Anything usable can be donated to charity. If you’re getting rid of large items (like furniture) or valuable (like antiques), you can list these items on Facebook Marketplace if you’d prefer to make some money.

Visualize the layout of your new space. 

Visualizing the layout of your soon-to-be home will allow you to conceptualize what will go where. If you think something won’t fit but you don’t want to get rid of it, consider using our storage units. They’re clean, spacious, and climate-controlled with 24/7 monitoring. We offer short-term units if you decide that you’d like to move these items into your space down the road and long-term units to house all of your (meaningful) odds and ends. Our prices are always reasonable.

  • Start with the big stuff: Starting with large items, like furniture, makes it easier to sort the small stuff later on.
  • Don’t get overwhelmed: It’s a good idea to block off a specific amount of time each day for downsizing to prevent feeling overwhelmed.
  • Please don’t do it alone! :Moving can be stressful and, at times, downright exhausting. It isn’t just physically taxing, but emotionally taxing, too. Planning and executing a move are far too much to do without help, no matter what your age. We recommend getting friends and family to assist with downsizing. Then, let us do the heavy lifting. We offer a full packing and loading service so that you can focus on the exciting parts of your relocation. To make it even easier, you’ll get a dedicated account manager to communicate with throughout your move.

 

What you should do before choosing a retirement or assisted living community.

 Miami, Boca Raton, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach are home to the nation’s most sought-after retirement communities. Suffice it to say; Southeast Florida is full of amazing options for the 55+ crowd. 

Consider The ‘Why.’

Do you or your loved one need a little extra help? 

While a lot of people remain independent for the rest of their lives, others require additional services. Whichever type of community you choose, an active social life will be an advantage of both.

Are you moving to live closer to loved ones? If so, check out the options closest to your friends and family. If they live in Miami, opting for a Miami community may be a better option than in West Palm Beach.

Are you craving community? Most South Florida Retirement and assisted living communities offer many activities and trips that allow seniors to mingle with others with similar interests and values. Check out each community’s websites that you’re considering, making sure they check off all of your boxes. Retirement is the perfect time to make meaningful friendships, and doing so helps to maintain emotional and physical well-being.

Are amenities important? Communities in South Florida often boast resort-style amenities, like pools and onsite dining. Some South Florida retirement communities even have dog parks. If having everything you need within walking distance is a must, research communities online. If it’s feasible, tour the grounds of your top contenders.

 

Tips for Moving Seniors into Your South Florida Home

Whether it’s due to a health condition or old age, most people reach a point when having some day-to-day help (and company) is necessary. Multigenerational living can be an incredible bonding experience for everyone, and it helps your elderly parent avoid feelings of isolation.

Focus on the positive. 

No matter how close you are to your parent, you likely don’t agree on everything. Although this will inevitably change your household dynamics, a lot of the change will probably be positive. Accentuate the good stuff. If you’re struggling to be positive, make a list. Include things like “The kids will get to bond with grandma” or “mom can babysit, which will make it easier to go on date nights.”

Be compassionate. 

Modeling compassion will set an excellent example for your children. Discuss ways the kids can help their grandparents.

Communicate about your concerns. 

Before your parent moves in, discuss any concerns with the rest of the household and ask about their concerns. Decide if there’s anything that needs to be addressed as a unit.

It’s also important to talk openly with your parent about both of your concerns. It may be as easy as telling each other what bothers you. While you’re having this conversation, work out a way for both of you to get and give privacy. Keep in mind that it’s difficult for your parent to give up independence, so assure them that you aren’t going to hover or tell them what to do.

Agree to disagree. 

You and your parent have evolved and may hold very different beliefs regarding politics, religion and values. That’s okay. Everyone should come to the mutual understanding that criticism for the sake of criticism should be avoided (out loud, at the very least). Although you may not agree, you need to respect each other.

Make your home safe for your parent. 

If you’re not sure where to start, local agencies can provide in-home safety assessments. Simple adjustments to your living space can make a big difference. Make sure that your home is free of tripping hazards (like toys and pets). Of course, you don’t need to get rid of your beloved cat but making sure the cat is in another part of the house while your parent is walking around to prevent falls.

Safety tips from AARP

  • Add textured, no-slip stripsin the bathtub and shower.
  • Apply nonslip waxon floors.
  • Place a waterproof seator chair in the shower.
  • Put nonskid treadson steps.
  • Remove throw rugs.
  • Remove wheelson chairs.
  • Replace standard doorknobswith lever handles.
  • Replace toiletwith a raised or high-profile toilet.
  • Use rubber-backed bathmats.
  • Alter the shower for walk-in rather than step-over entry.
  • Create zero-threshold entryways.
  • Move light switchesfor easy reach from a wheelchair or bed.
  • Widen doorways and hallways.

 

Whether you’re moving into a retirement or assisted living community, helping a loved one move, or moving a senior into your South Florida home, we want to make it as stress-free as possible for everyone. Our professional and courteous crew is happy to help you from start to finish. Contact us today for a customized plan that fits your needs.

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